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Author Topic: Question about a broken track  (Read 6852 times)
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John D
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« on: March 26, 2008, 04:58:21 PM »

Does anyone here have experience chaining or cabling a broken track together as a temporary measure to move a tractor?   What do I have to watch out for - places where it could get hung up?

I need to move a Cletrac AG-6 I bought with a broken track - apparently it is off the tractor now.

Thanks!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by John D » Logged

John D
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Orangeman
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« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2008, 07:44:11 PM »

Hello John: I have given your inquiry some thought and would like to offer several options for you to chew on.

1.  Is the master pin out of the chain or is the chain broken at some other or at several locations rather than at the master pin?

Do you have access to a metal supplier.  I would take a micrometer and measure the Pin OD then proceed to a metal shop and cut one to length and do a temporary install.

2. If that option does not fix the broken track problem, can you fix an oak beam to the bottom of the rail and grease the heck out of it and winch it forward enough on some sheet metal or on to a sheet of High Density Polyethylene to get it on to an equipment trailer. Landfills use the HDPE for thier liners and it has a low coefficient of friction. If  you go to the landfill you could probably get a sheet for cheap.   The oak or hardwood beam would be affixed in such a way so the idler and the sprocket do not touch the ground.

3. Years ago, the Frank G. Hough Corporation supplied a two wheeled donkey that would affix to the rails of some Allis Crawlers that so that the whole machine could lifted off the ground and could be transported.  I am uncertain if these Hough donkeys could be used on other brands, such as Cletrac's.

4. Do you have access to a welder?? Can you do some field fabricating at least enough to stitch the track together, then move the machine that way???

Well not sure any of these will work, but some thoughts that might lead to a solution.  Hope you get the machine. Wish I was there to lend a hand.  Take Care John... Orangeman.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Orangeman » Logged

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John D
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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2008, 09:16:28 PM »

Quote from: "Orangeman"
Hello John: I have given your inquiry some thought and would like to offer several options for you to chew on.

1.  Is the master pin out of the chain or is the chain broken at some other or at several locations rather than at the master pin?

Do you have access to a metal supplier.  I would take a micrometer and measure the Pin OD then proceed to a metal shop and cut one to length and do a temporary install.

2. If that option does not fix the broken track problem, can you fix an oak beam to the bottom of the rail and grease the heck out of it and winch it forward enough on some sheet metal or on to a sheet of High Density Polyethylene to get it on to an equipment trailer. Landfills use the HDPE for thier liners and it has a low coefficient of friction. If  you go to the landfill you could probably get a sheet for cheap.   The oak or hardwood beam would be affixed in such a way so the idler and the sprocket do not touch the ground.

3. Years ago, the Frank G. Hough Corporation supplied a two wheeled donkey that would affix to the rails of some Allis Crawlers that so that the whole machine could lifted off the ground and could be transported.  I am uncertain if these Hough donkeys could be used on other brands, such as Cletrac's.

4. Do you have access to a welder?? Can you do some field fabricating at least enough to stitch the track together, then move the machine that way???

Well not sure any of these will work, but some thoughts that might lead to a solution.  Hope you get the machine. Wish I was there to lend a hand.  Take Care John... Orangeman.


Thanks for some good suggestions!  I spoke with the seller - he has a welder and will do a quick repair to the chain and get it back on the tractor.  Most of the transporters I contacted would only take the job if it moved on its own.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by John D » Logged

John D
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John D
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2008, 09:12:59 PM »

Got the machine home today.  Used some metal from a frame lift kit and fabricated a temporary link to replace the missing one.  Will need to buy a new link and pin.  Suggestions on removing a track pin - pressing out vs sledge and drift?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by John D » Logged

John D
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« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2008, 06:25:37 AM »

John: A hydraulic powered field track press is an expensive unit.  I think you could make one from a porta power.  You might want to find a short length of pipe that matches the OD of the bushing housing and tack weld in place.  Then insert a drift into pipe that is slightly smaller than the ID of the master pin and use a sledge to knock out the master pin.  I would heat the Master PIN bushing first and please remember to leave the pad on if possible so the driving of the PIN does not spread the link. Hope that helps!  

I like a twenty pound mall as the force to drive the PIN.  Orangeman
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Orangeman » Logged

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Bob
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« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2008, 07:42:42 PM »

If you need my best friend has 2 track presses. I am in bradford, Pa.

Bob
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by Bob » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2008, 09:52:44 PM »

Quote from: "Bob"
If you need my best friend has 2 track presses. I am in bradford, Pa.

Bob

I very much appreciate the offer, Bob.  I will have to take it to someone local.

Thanks!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by John D » Logged

John D
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John D
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« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2008, 09:53:32 PM »

Quote from: "Orangeman"
John: A hydraulic powered field track press is an expensive unit.  I think you could make one from a porta power.  You might want to find a short length of pipe that matches the OD of the bushing housing and tack weld in place.  Then insert a drift into pipe that is slightly smaller than the ID of the master pin and use a sledge to knock out the master pin.  I would heat the Master PIN bushing first and please remember to leave the pad on if possible so the driving of the PIN does not spread the link. Hope that helps!  

I like a twenty pound mall as the force to drive the PIN.  Orangeman


Thanks for your input O-man!  I will let you know what happens.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by John D » Logged

John D
If you want to do what you want to do, you have to do what you have to do.
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