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Author Topic: AG-6 Field Repair - Track off front idlers and rear sprocket  (Read 2263 times)
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John D
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« on: October 16, 2012, 03:36:59 PM »

Short story: Need help getting back on track!  Track came off rear sprocket and front idlers, and was jammed inside against the frame.
Field repair needed to get my 1945 AG-6 out of the woods.

The long story: The tracks are both very loose, and I have had success getting them back on before - if only partially off, I can usually back up and turn to put the proper pressure on them and encourage them to play nice. I've even been successful using pry bars and come-alongs to get them back on when off either the front rollers or rear sprocket.

I pay particular attention to the tracks, since I am aware of their tendency to jump off.   In August 2011, I was working on a new trail, and when I made a turn - the right track came off both front and back, and all my attempts to get it back on have failed.  A lot of unrelated "stuff" got in the way, and I left it under a tarp until last weekend, when I finally got a chance to spend some time with it.
Obviously, if I were able to move the adjuster, that would help a lot, or if I had a hydraulic press, I would have removed a link pin and that would make the repair so much easier.

Because the track was completely wrapped around the rear guide (inboard of the sprocket) I decided to take the rear sprocket off, and was able to pull the track back into alignment, front to back.  The challenge for next weekend is to see if I can get the sprocket back on with the track wrapped around it.  The track has a lot of slop in it, (stretched), and the adjuster is unmovable. I am envisioning putting the sprocket inside the track, and using a come-along to pull the track backward and outward, then a second come-along to pull the sprocket in toward the rear spindle.  Based on how loose the track is, I believe there would be enough play to make this happen.  Aligning the sprocket keyway and woodruff keys will add to the fun, no doubt. 

My questions are:
Has anyone else attempted this method of getting the track back on?  Any other suggestions?
What field repairs have you done on your tracks?
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John D
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Bob
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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2012, 07:40:33 PM »

Hi John D! Good to hear from you again!

I would suggest taking the master pin out. Usually they are fairly easy to remove. If the tracks are loose like you say it shouldn't be too hard to put the pin back in. I always put the pin in with the chain on the sprocket, using the teeth to hold the chain for the pin. Hopefully that will do it for you.

Good luck!

Bob
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